Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Secure. The. Manger

Gil was apparently doing some cleaning around the homestead and offered his Nativity set to the department to display this Christmas season.  Christmas.  I said Christmas.  CHRISTMAS!!!!  It's a religious hospital so we don't have to be politically correct.

Gil's Nativity set is a behemoth of a thing about 3 feet by 2 feet and stands about 18 inches high; it was hand made by his grandfather and has a nice, Christmas-in-the-backwoods-of-Maine kind of feel to it.  It's rustic and....stable-like.  And appopriately enclosed on three sides, with a slanted roof and filled with hay.  It is kind of a family heirloom I guess, so I was concerned about its contents if it was to be placed in our waiting area.

You may recall that last year our own pathetic Nativity set was the victim of light fingered douche baggery as both the Jesus and Mary (pretty much the whole reason for the season) were purloined from our waiting room.  Gil had already thought of that and had purchased a piece of Plexiglas to screw into the front of the manger to keep the pieces from being removed.  As Gil prepared his tools,  I examined this scheme for loopholes.  While I was at it, I placed the Wise Men in the hay loft with the animals, and the Baby Jesus on the roof.  As it should be.  The only problem I could see was that once the Plexiglas went on, the figurines would not be secured.  Nothing would prevent someone either shaking it like a Polaroid picture or knocking the whole thing off the table. 

We shall see what kind of fu*kery people get up to with that Nativity set.

On another note, I am feeling a little less humbuggy as we nurses have decided against giving the docs a bottle of wine, or monogrammed bottle stopper or some shit this year.  We will instead be giving a donation to the Wounded Warrior Project in the name of their physician's group. 

1 comment:

Lynda Halliger-Otvos said...

Good for you for the WWP; they can actually get some mileage out of a donation. Proud of all our wounded-warriors and activists, photographers and journalists, medical teams and sewer diggers.